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Monday: ​9-5Closed for lunch 12-1:10

Tuesday: 9-5 Closed for lunch 12-1:10

Wednesday: ​9-7

Thursday: 9-5 Closed for lunch 12-1:10

Friday: ​8-2

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La Porte Vision Center

401 W. Fairmont Pkwy. Ste. A

La Porte, TX 77571

Call (281)471-6546

Helping you and your family see into the future

La Porte Vision Center


A cataract is a clouding of the normally clear lens of the eye. For people who have cataracts, seeing through cloudy lenses is a bit like looking through a frosty or fogged-up window. Clouded vision caused by cataracts can make it more difficult to read, drive a car (especially at night) or see the expression on a friend's face.

Most cataracts develop slowly and don't disturb your eyesight early on. But with time, cataracts will eventually interfere with your vision.

At first, stronger lighting and eyeglasses can help you deal with cataracts. But if impaired vision interferes with your usual activities, you might need cataract surgery. Fortunately, cataract surgery is generally a safe, effective procedure.

How a cataract forms


A cataract is a cloudy lens. The lens is positioned behind the colored part of your eye (iris). The lens focuses light that passes into your eye, producing clear, sharp images on the retina — the light-sensitive membrane in the eye that functions like the film in a camera.

As you age, the lenses in your eyes become less flexible, less transparent and thicker. Age-related and other medical conditions cause proteins and fibers within the lenses to break down and clump together, clouding the lenses.

As the cataract continues to develop, the clouding becomes denser. A cataract scatters and blocks the light as it passes through the lens, preventing a sharply defined image from reaching your retina. As a result, your vision becomes blurred.

Cataracts generally develop in both eyes, but not always at the same rate. The cataract in one eye may be more advanced than the other, causing a difference in vision between eyes.


Risk factors

Factors that increase your risk of cataracts include:

Increasing age

Diabetes

Excessive exposure to sunlight
Smoking
Obesity
High blood pressure
Previous eye injury or inflammation
Previous eye surgery
Prolonged use of corticosteroid medications
Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol


What’s the Treatment?

Surgery is the only way to treat cataracts, but you may not need it right away. If you catch the problem at an early stage, you might be able to get by with a new prescription for your glasses. A stronger lens can make your vision better for a while. If you have trouble reading, try a brighter lamp or a magnifying glass. If glare is a problem for you, check out special glasses that have an anti-glare coating. They can help when you drive at night.

Keep close tabs on how your cataracts affect the way you see. When your vision troubles start to get in the way of your daily routine -- especially if they make driving dangerous -- it's time to talk to the doctor about surgery.